NOAA’s GOES-16 Satellite sends first images to Earth

NOAA’s GOES-16 Satellite sends first images to Earth

Washington: GOES-16, the first spacecraft in NOAA’s next-generation of geostationary satellites, has sent the first high-resolution images from its Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) instrument.

Among them is a composite color full-disk visible image of the Western Hemisphere captured on January 15, 2017. Created using several of the ABI’s 16 spectral channels, the full-disk image offers an example the satellite’s advanced technology.

The ABI can provide a full disk image of the Earth every 15 minutes, one of the continental US every five minutes and has the ability to target regional areas where severe weather, hurricanes, wildfires, volcanic eruptions or other high-impact environmental phenomena are occurring as often as every 30 seconds.

The ABI covers the Earth five-times faster than the current generation GOES imagers and has four times greater spatial resolution, allowing meteorologists to see smaller features of the Earth’s atmosphere and weather systems.

“The image is much more than a pretty picture, it is the future of weather observations and forecasting,” said Louis W Uccellini, director, NOAA’s National Weather Service, Silver Spring.

NASA successfully launched GOES-R at 6:42 p.m. EST on November 19, 2016 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida and it was renamed GOES-16 when it achieved orbit. GOES-16 is now observing the planet from an equatorial view approximately 22,300 miles above the surface of the Earth.

Image Credits: NOAA

IBNS

 

 

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Latest Posts